Why doesn't sparring resemble training?

Discussion in 'General' started by cfr, Jun 10, 2008.

  1. Raul

    Raul Mananandata

    Sorry, no time to be resourceful.. I'm busy practicing my bad footwork. Now, can you just describe that so-called funny footwork? Is that so hard? Come on, be generous.
     
  2. baganing_balyan

    baganing_balyan New Member

    you're the master.... mmmmm .... I am just a beltless fma practitioner.
     
  3. cfr

    cfr New Member

    I just watched this youTube clip and it really made a lot of sense. Many people like myself see lots of checking with the empty hand in training, but then it goes out the window in sparring. The explanations offered in this video made total sense.

    Thanks!
     
  4. baganing_balyan

    baganing_balyan New Member

    Why doesn't sparring resemble training?

    Due to lack of concepts. Most FMA practitioners just hit or strike whatever they can. No consistency. No systematic offense and defense. No theoretical framework. Some do no even know the physics behind the footworks, the diagonal swinging of the sticks, and the ideas about biomechanics. Early Filipinos practiced those using traditional concepts and terms.
     
  5. Bob Hubbard

    Bob Hubbard Darth Vindicatus Supporting Member

    Because sparring isn't a real fight. If you look at enough different arts sparring, you'll find the same punch-kick-swing syndrome.
     
  6. baganing_balyan

    baganing_balyan New Member

    i see the same problems in dogbrothers event. They just hit whatever they can and they don't even care about movement, footwork, etc.

    Of course I expect them not to use those because they don't know when and why they have to use those.

    FMA teachers need to go back to traditional concepts and study Filipino philosophy so they will really understand what they are doing.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2008
  7. Bob Hubbard

    Bob Hubbard Darth Vindicatus Supporting Member

    Rather conceited and uneducated to say they don't know it if you hven't worked with them. Why use complex when simple works just fine.
     
  8. baganing_balyan

    baganing_balyan New Member

    when i see a spade i call it a spade.
     
  9. Bob Hubbard

    Bob Hubbard Darth Vindicatus Supporting Member

    If you haven't worked with said spade, you don't know all it is capable of.
    There are 10,000 uses for a stick besides for hitting someone.
    There are 10,000 different ways to inflict pain with said stick.
    Why would I step to the left, pivot, and execute text book abinico when a cave man overhead to the skull while standing in place works just fine?
    Last guy I beat sparring had great foot work, was ducking and covering, was floating like a butterfly and doing these really cool weaving patters with his sticks. Textbook perfect. I stood still and backhanded him. I win. He looked pretty, but pretty only counts when it does. After a fight, no one will remember what type of sticks you had, if your footwork was right, if you had good form, if you looked like a master if you used a #1 or a #7, etc. All they remember is who walked away, and who picked themselves up off the ground or got carried away.
     
  10. baganing_balyan

    baganing_balyan New Member

    if one masters all forms and variations of abaniko and knows how and when to use them, I don't think anyone or a cave man can go near him.

    there is abaniko for a show and abaniko for hitting vital immobilizing points. that's the difference. most lear the show part. I don't know if some even know that abaniko is used for defensive offense and used to target certain body parts. I am not sure if some people know why it is even called abaniko.
     
  11. Bob Hubbard

    Bob Hubbard Darth Vindicatus Supporting Member

    Doesn't matter. Master your stick. At 50' you can't hit me. Mr. Smith and Mr. Wesson however can hit you.

    Sparring match I had once, looked more like a hockey brawl than anything else. Hard to swing a stick when your shirts been pulled up over your head and your being ridden like a bronc being busted.

    Saw a guy once, had a real simple, no BS system, 3 techniques, 3 angles of attack, etc. Half the class walked out sucking on ice and looking for dit dat jow (or whatever its called). Hard core stuff. Don't confuse fancy moves with effective ones. Every move has it's place and time, and sparring in most cases, isn't the time.
     
  12. baganing_balyan

    baganing_balyan New Member

    i can't blame you. there is an FMA training like that-- hit, strike, attack anyway and anywhere you can. I call it FMA poker-- half luck-half chance
     
  13. Bob Hubbard

    Bob Hubbard Darth Vindicatus Supporting Member

    Then you show the holes in your training.
     
  14. cfr

    cfr New Member

    Well then FMA must be a truly unique style. Typically anyone has at least a punchers chance when fighting empty handed, despite the opponent being a master in this or that.
     
  15. PG Michael B

    PG Michael B Oso Grande

    This thread has turned into carabao crap.....hmmm funny how they all do lately.
     
  16. Bob Hubbard

    Bob Hubbard Darth Vindicatus Supporting Member

    I think they'll be better for a bit now.

    So, going back to the title here "Why doesn't sparring resemble training" why doesn't it? Should it? Should the techniques you use in sparring rise or fall to the level of your opponent? Are some techniques not effective in sparring but effective when used in 'reality'? Etc.
     
  17. cfr

    cfr New Member

    Whats carabao?
     
  18. PG Michael B

    PG Michael B Oso Grande

    Water Buffalo indigenous to the Philippines
     
  19. Brock

    Brock Asha'man

    Generally it's the otherway around. Generally because of protective equipment and such sparring becomes less defensive.
     

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