NoVA Arnis in the Park

Discussion in 'NoVA Arnis in the Park' started by Dr. Tye W. Botting, Aug 11, 2015.

  1. Today's arnis, 22 Jul 2018: We continued to review balintawak groupings/variations and necopa inserts from of forehand and backhand pakgang blocks. After that it was Knife Day, so we worked some vasic basic disarms, stressing the lessons in each, such as moving, using safer portions of arms, using leverage, contact trap/grabs, moving your opponent, etc. Then it was the 5-6-7 drill from Modern Arnis. From there, I took the opportunity to review some material from yesterday's excellent group seminar, this time being Guro Nyah Kuti's payang flow drill against knife slashes along angles 1 through 5 in a give-and-take fashion. We also covered Guro Jhun R. Occidental's reverse-grip blade-snake/parry/stab drill. Finally, we covered a drill we used to call knife tapi-tapi wherein one person is reverse/icepick grip and the other is hammer/normal grip, starting with hammer-grip doing a #5 and ending with icepick-grip doing #6 then filet/slash and #7 pokes.
     
  2. Today's arnis, 29 July 2018: We started with a quick review of groupings again, and then went on to work inserts from Necopa balintawak, both duplicating what Master Rino showed earlier this year and working off the principles that were his main point. After at least 20 different variations, our brains needed a change of pace so we worked on sinawalis, including single sinawalis, double sinawalis, and x sinawalis, rotating through several variations of each while in motion when possible. Finally we finished with several variations for countering the standard disarm #1 based on what Guro Ramsey shared from last weekend (in, snake, down, and up vs the initial setup).
     
  3. Today's arnis, 12 Aug 2018, using Tom Valesky's notes:

    Pekiti Tirsia espada y daga attacks, set 1

    (Note: we learned #5 of this sequence previously)

    (Note: the last 5 moves in #5 (cut to right, tap ground and stab, cut up, corkscrew thrust, step back and chamber over left shoulder) are referred to as "sigida stepping." Most of these end with some variation of sigida stepping).

    Note: "harada" is a snapping downward blow delivered from the elbow.

    All of these start with right foot forward

    These are all fairly similar; especially the first 4, which build on one another.

    #1 simultaneously do these 3 things
    1) tap the ground with your stick
    2) thrust forward with knife to guard head
    3) pick up your rear (left) foot; ideally kick yourself in the butt with it.
    2) set left foot back down so you remain with right foot forward. Slice straight upward with stick
    3) corkscrew thrust with stick (thrust with palm up, then turn palm down and press stick to right)
    4) lift right (front) foot, ideally kick yourself in the butt with it.

    #2 - same as #1, but for the first step, do a doplete (2 circling downward hits) with the second hit touching the ground as you thrust the dagger, and don't pick up the rear foot. Steps 2, 3, and 4 are the same

    3) same as #2, but as you hit the ground, step your left foot forward into a cross stance. When you do the upward slice in step 2, place your left foot back where it started, so you're in a right-leading stance

    4) same as #3, but for the last movement, instead of kicking yourself in the butt with your right foot, step back with it, so you're in a left-leading cross stance.

    #5 - (we've done this one before)
    - harada
    - step and plunging downward thrust with knife
    - bring stick around and #2 from under left arm
    - straight thrust with knife, bringing stick back to right shoulder
    - step left foot back and horizontal right-to-left strike
    - sigida stepping to finish
    - cut to right
    - tap ground with stick and thrust knife
    - slice straight up with stick hand
    - thrust with palm up and corkscrew to right, ending palm down
    - step back with right foot and chamber stick at left shoulder

    #6 - starts and ends like #5, but after the harada/stab/harada/thrust sequence, you do a double upward cut with the stick (the idea being to knock loose a grab on your knife), and thrust under the second cut, chambering the stick over your left shoulder. You then step back with the left foot and do a double downward hit followed by a thrust, and finish with sigida stepping. So, it's
    - harada
    - step and plunging downward thrust with knife
    - bring stick around and #2 from under left arm
    - straight thrust with knife, bringing stick back near right thigh
    - upward cut with stick to knock loose a grab on the knife hand
    - another upward cut with stick, and thrust the knife underneath the cut
    - step left foot back and double downward stick strike, followed by a thrust
    - sigida stepping to finish
    - cut to right
    - tap ground with stick and thrust knife
    - slice straight up with stick hand
    - thrust with palm up and corkscrew to right, ending palm down
    - step back with right foot and chamber stick at left shoulder

    NECOPA stuff
    clipping drill
    - throw a #1 strike, then reach out and grab, and clip to your left hip
    - transfer the clip to use your right punyo to keep it in place against your left hip. Reach out and grab, and clip to your right shoulder
    - throw a #2 strike, then reach out and clip to your right hip.
    - so, it's
    - hit, reach clip
    - transfer, reach, clip
    - hit, reach, clip

    Tapi-tapi counters
    - high and low
    - forehand and backhand

    High forehand
    - I throw a #1
    - he does a tapi-tapi block/check/strike
    - I do a tapi-tapi block, then slap his block down and follow with a #1

    Low forehand
    - I throw a #1
    - he does a tapi-tapi block/check/strike
    - I do a tapi-tapi block, then press his elbow in (closing) and hit his leg (he turns so he takes the hit on the back of the knee and not bone)

    High backhand
    - I throw a #7
    - he does a tapi-tapi block/check/strike
    - I do a tapi-tapi block, then slide my hand down to grab his stick and do a #2
    - if you try to do the hit without shifting your grip, you'll tangle yourself up
    Low backhand
    - I throw a #7
    - he does a tapi-tapi block/check/strike
    - I do a tapi-tapi block, then slide my hand down to grab his stick and do a #2
    - I do a tapi-tapi block, then press his elbow in (closing) and hit his leg (he turns so he takes the hit on the back of the knee and not bone)

    The idea with all of these is that you know how he's going to respond, so you can get ahead of him.

    NECOPA version of high forehand response - first abaniko to right eye, then do a #1 to finish while pressing in with left hand on his elbow or upper arm (gunting).

    Some more NECOPA scenarios (note that the numbers I'm using are just so I can keep track of them within these notes; they have no meaning outside of this page of notes

    #1 I hit with #1, he does a block/check/strike, I do a tapi-tapi block. I clip his stick to my left hip and hit with #1. He reaches out to grab. I hit him in the ribs with his own stick. At this point, it can go several ways;
    - if hitting his ribs kept him from blocking my #1, I finish with it.
    - if he grabbed my #1, I do a dropping punyo to break his grip and finish with #1
    - if we're very close and he didn't grab me, I do a punyo to his face to gain distance, then finish with #1

    #2 I hit with #1, he does a block/check/strike, I do a tapi-tapi block. I clip his stick to my right shoulder (actually, more under the armpit) and do a #1. He grabs my stick wrist. I use his stick, moving counterclockwise, to clear his grab, then finish with #1
    - If his grab is strong and I have trouble clearing it with my stick, let go of his stick, put your left hand on his right upper arm or elbow, and press inward (gunting) as you throw a #1 to finish.
    - variation 1: you throw the #1 and he reaches for it. Stop your motion to evade his grab, and change the strike to a horizontal strike to the head. Follow with abaniko to his right eye, then a gunting #1 to finish
    - variation 2: same as variation 1, but use the first hit to hit his grabbing hand.
     

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