NoVA Arnis in the Park

Discussion in 'NoVA Arnis in the Park' started by Dr. Tye W. Botting, Aug 11, 2015.

  1. Today's arnis, 19 March 2017: As a "warm up," we reviewed the 4 LvR sequences from last week to catch up those who were out and then added one more slight variation. From there, I wanted to wake up the live hands (both left and right), so we worked block-check-counter (BCC) versus the first 4 angles of attack using right-hand feed, left-hand feed, and then two-hand feed. We did twice as many rounds of that on folks' left-hand-cane-hand than right so as to wake up the usually-lagging live right hand a bit more. This drill also works wonders to just get folks used to incoming attack angles, no matter what handed your opponeent is. From there, we worked it even more, emphasizing following up with multiple strikes via striking styles and combinations after the BCC. This helped subconsciously reinforce the check hand since it is more needed (monitor/manage/control) when working followup combinations. Lastly, to keep people off-balance from the unexpected we worked right-handed disarms against a left-handed attacker - just doing the normal disarm since that's what's programmed and adapting to make it work against a left-hand attack for a given incoming angle. Basics, but off-kilter basics. Good day.
    johnerikLvRold.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2017
  2. Today's arnis, 26 Mar 2017: Lots of folks on the court today along with a couple new ones - good deal! (10-12 at the start; much more like it and lots of good energy today! We started with H-H and H-L single sinawali (with pokes if known), then sinawali boxing drill: offensive, defensive, and elbow shield, then the 8 basic strikes, then empty-hand single sinawali (with punches), then single sinawali with a few traps and locks (standing center, outside wrist, center, underhand-trap, etc). Then review 8 basic strikes. Then walk away and other grab releases as basics for understanding leverage and lock setups. Finally, we finished with 8 basic strikes again so they "stick."
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2017
  3. Today's arnis, 2 Apr 2017: We warmed up with sinawalis, starting with 4 corners, then doing sinawali 10 (also single-stick version), then single sinawali with ground-tap, then single sinawali with ground-tap and hit-to-spin. Then we worked some details of standup dumog, including armbar and standing armbar (with footwork), then a bunch of different kinds of center lock: cross-grab straight to center lock, same-side grab to center lock, same-side to off-hand palm center lock (with elbow pressure), same-side to 2-finger center, cross-grap to thumb center lock, "high five" to horizontal (or flat) reverse center lock, "high five" to standing center lock, grab to standing center lock, and probably a whole host of other variations and extensions or flows. From there we went on to work the trading finger locks drill that Prof used to have us warm up with at camps sometimes, point then lock, then grab and lock, then grab and lock, etc, using fingers, thumbs, whatever. From there, we did some simple handshaking thumb locks, pinky locks, and others. A day of basic leverages and finding what works for you to understand the principles and optimizations possible whatever the opportunity. And again, more people now that there's better weather - 9 plus me today I think.
     
  4. Today's arnis, 9 Arnis 2017: We reviewed Baston Anyo Isa and Dalawa, with a brief discussion on use of the abaniko double-action versus the double-zero strike. From there we worked on the leverage disarm (standard #1) but applied it against standard strikes 1, 3, 5, 9, and 12. We also covered the punyo hook disarm (standard #10) and applied it against standard strikes 1, 3, 5, 9, 10, and 12 - I left off 8 for some reason, but of course it works there too. For these different angles, the disarm sometime is perfectly viable and sometimes it's a bit "reachy" but useful to look at anyway so as to better understand the leverages and adjustments necessary and/or possible when things aren't quite right. We then worked on the single lock basics from an arm-akimbo entry, then went to single lock from armbar, then single lock from the cane-retention entry. We then covered changing the punyo-hook disarm to a punyo-hook single lock to make that connection. I really enjoy re-looking at the basics and investigating connections and adaptations and linkages.

     
  5. Today's arnis, 23 Apr 2017: After a great training weekend in NC, I made it back in time to do arnis in the park with a new person showing up. We started with the cane anyos, the worked on details of the first half of Anyo Isa Empty Hand, then worked on applications for some of the sequences. After that we worked on 4 Corners Sinawali and Single Sinawali. Lots of material for the new person, and lots of good work on the basics and breadth of exploration for the others.
     
  6. Today's arnis, 29 Apr 2017: The 3rd Annual Spring FMA Thing was a roaring success. We started just after 9am at Van Dyck Park in Fairfax, VA, and didn't leave until about 6:30pm, with almost 40 participants in total, averaging 25+ at any given time. There were 9 sessions starting first with Guro Mosi Jack (FCS Kali) covering a nice multiple person drill, with progressions, variations, and more. Guro Patrick Rogers (Combate Eskrima Orehinal) then shared a lot of great info on history and finer points of blade work, letting folks even handle and work with a wide variety of live blades from his personal collection - his drills and setups let people get a better feel for how the different blades work at different ranges, weights, and lengths. Guro Tom Saysithideth (Kombatan) worked block check counter drills with an emphasis on body mechanics both for setup and for delivery. Guro Carl Minkel (Modern Arnis and PTK) covered some basic Pekiti Tirsia drills as a setup into left-vs-right tapi-tapi and then worked up through a nice progression to teach several of the left-versus-right tapi-tapi insert as well as hand-change possibilities, and then he went on to some PT knife work. Guro John Ralston (Modern Arnis and CSSD/SC) covered a lot of good material bridging the link from stick to blade work. After lunch, Guro Roman Picardo (Modern Arnis) covered the importance of footwork and appropriate height control - important stuff to help people get more out of their movements. Guro Kibo Kim (Visayan Sovilla Eskrima Kali) came straight from another engagement and worked give-and-take pendulum flow with bladed weapons as well as his kuntaw silat empty-hand material. Guro Tye Botting then covered a set of drills to ease people into cane sparring starting with trading specific block-check-counter moves, a la 6-count drill (anim na bilang) or the box drill sumbradas, and then making it purely random - both people end up blocking checking and countering at random, then moving to a double-stick version, and also setting up some simple sparring strategies like attacking when the opponent chambers, attacking the hand, and target misdirection. Finally, the last session was simple padded-stick sparring with the opponents agreeing on targets, contact level, and other rules ahead of time - great fun for everyone. We had about 20 separate matches in about 1.5 hours at the end of the gathering. What a great way to end the event! A perfect day of FMA family sharing across the board - thanks to all who came and played!

    2017-04-29 09.40.10.jpg 2017-04-29 10.59.38.jpg 2017-04-29 10.24.40.jpg 2017-04-29 11.09.56.jpg 2017-04-29 15.15.48.jpg 2017-04-29 15.23.40.jpg 2017-04-29 15.26.18.jpg 2017-04-29 17.07.14.jpg 2017-04-29 17.11.09.jpg 2017-04-29 17.14.47.jpg
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2017
  7. Today's arnis, 30 Apr 2017 : Nice group of 10 folks today, back to working on the basics. We started with the 8 basic strikes, moved up through block and check, then did block check and counter (BCC), then did BCC with striking styles, first banda y banda with shove-checking, then multiple tusoks, then some also did multiple punyos, rompida, abaniko double action, multiple abanikos, taas baba, piguro de otso, multiple witiks, and then mixing the striking styles as part of each counter. From there we did empty-hand single sinawali with speed and distance pressure, then with inserting a high punch and continuing, then with catching and counter striking (palm or hammer) to behind the ear, then if they block, you catch and double trap while palming to the face with the other hand. Then we worked optional multiple palms as you switch double-trapping hands, and finally we worked the under elbow forearm knife-hook to lock up their balance and set up the takedown. Good day with some new faces and some part-time faces - thanks!

    2017-04-30 11.01.39.jpg 2017-04-30 11.03.23.jpg
     
  8. Today's arnis, 14 May 2017: Happy mother's day, and a few came out to play anyway. We warmed up with double sinawali, then taking cues from Suro Jason Inay's material from last week, we jumped right into the mirrored version, after discussing two different ways to do mirrored sinawalis (standard chamber and mirrored chamber) and two different ways to do complement sinawalis (symmetric and asymmetric). From there we worked some largo mano drills with stepping to control the distance using backhand or forehand approach and using "with" and "against" approachs. Lots of stepping for everyone. After that, we closed the distance and worked some balintawak roots of tapi-tapi, using Grouping 1 to illustrate some basics like tukas, tapi-tapi (pakgang) block, limbo, clipping, lifting and clearing, and even hubad.
     
  9. Today's arnis, 28 May 2017: Low-key day with a handful+ of people. We warmed up with some double-stick carrenza with people flowing from natural motions through sinawalis and more. I emphasized that how good one is at transitions between sinawalis and other double-stick motions determines how adaptable a fighter you are. I then shared a snippet of a footwork drill for closing distance that I got from my friend Burton Richardson just last week - a Muay Thai lead-leg switch to set up that kick but followed by a stepping reverse punch (e.g. starting left lead, switch, stepping reverse punch) - you cover a LOT of ground that way, a la the walking punch from Hanshi Roger Greene. Lastly, we settled in and worked the way we do balintawak groupings 1 and 4, but with Astig/Buot character (classic tukas, limbo, and pakgang in different places). I really like the offensive tukas as a neat option, similar to the offensive sablig. Once these were starting to gel, I had them start thinking about transitions between them at different places and even doing tapi-tapi inserts and flowing back and forth and across. Fun stuff!
     

Share This Page