MT: Popularity: FMAs vs Other Arts

Discussion in 'FMA From Around the Web' started by balita, Jun 10, 2010.

  1. balita

    balita <B>News Bot</B>

    Popularity: FMAs vs Other Arts
    By geezer - 06-10-2010 02:01 PM

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    Ok, I'm not sure if this is a question or a rant. Here's the short of it. I practice and teach two arts, Ving Tsun and Eskrima. It's just a small, non-commercial group. But no matter what I do, interest in the Ving Tsun is 2 to 3 times greater than Eskrima. I don't teach this for a living, so what's my problem? Basically, just that I love doing Eskrima, and I'd really like to get more of my students involved. But there simply isn't the same level of interest! And it's not just me, either. I have friends in the area that do a variety of different FMA's. Some are really good. Not just instructor level good, but Master level good. And they seem to have the same problem. Too few students, not much dedication. It seems that there's way more interest in other arts ranging from the latest fads like MMA and BJJ, to Karate, Kung-fu, TKD, heck, you name it. What's up with that? Any thoughts?


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  2. Banakun

    Banakun New Member

    I think it's primarily because "self-defense" is usually associated with emptyhands and most people do not see the relevance of FMA as a practical civilian self-defense art. In my experience, many people see it as being "too brutal"...even when you are merely using a pen for your demo. Few civilians know the reality of the streets...that experienced muggers also have "counters" to standard techniques and stuff like that. Few people really have an idea of what it truly takes to take a man down. I know I didn't. I was 10 years into martial arts (the Karate kind) before I realized you can hit a guy on the head with a lead pipe, give him a gash 14 stitches good and he'd still be walking...all bloodied but walking. That's what got me thinking, I gotta pack more into my attacks and weapons are the way to go. It has to do with misconceptions about the reality of the streets. At least that's what I think...
     
  3. Carol

    Carol <font color = blue><b>Technical Administrator</b><

    Kids programs, kids programs, kids programs.
    Kids programs keep kids safe after school.
    Kids programs are profitable
    Kids programs bring in adult students that are serious about training because they have kids in the program.

    The folks that are doing FMA 5 or 6 days a week...such as Datu Hartman in Buffalo or Guros Mike and May Williams in Salem, Mass...have done very well with their kids programs. They have been teaching kids watering down their program to the point where both children and adults learn "kiddie krotty" and learn defenses against what's essentially an 8 year old's lunchroom shove.

    Many other arts have external draws outside of the training itself. A fancy uniform, status symbols, an intense cardiofitness workout, the chance to do like the guys on TV do.
     
  4. A friend of mine was just over and we were training together.

    He is a Wing Chun Sifu with almost 30 Years of experience. He is the only representative of his lineage in Europe. He was saying he usually gets about 6 students. His FMA class sometimes less. The generic Karate gym down the road gets 40 students. Go figure.

    Carols point about the kids and other benefits is definitely it though. I bet many of us did Karate as a kid. In my experience people tend to join FMA aged 30+ - probably when they realize that they can't kick that high forever. Or when they realize that they need something that actually teaches them balance LOL!

    Simon.
     
  5. Imua Kuntao

    Imua Kuntao New Member

    We teach 3 different styles, Danzan-ryu ju jitsu, Escrima-Kuntaw, and Taekwondo. Taekwondo and ju jitsu seem to more popular than the Escrima class. The ju jitsu class has testing once a year, the taekwondo class test every 4 months, I like the once a year promotion myself. I know one person joined the taekwondo class to become a Black belt in
    2 years. Go figure.
     

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