MT: Kuntaw, Filipino Martial Art on Web TV

Discussion in 'General' started by balita, Sep 18, 2007.

  1. balita

    balita <B>News Bot</B>

    Kuntaw, Filipino Martial Art on Web TV
    By Brooklynmonk - Tue, 18 Sep 2007 03:41:01 GMT

    ====================

    [​IMG]By Dante Scott

    Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3haZwrsY_oM


    Announcing the launch of Martial Arts Odyssey, the new Web TV show, starring Antonio Graceffo (The Monk from Brooklyn) as he travels through Asia, training and documenting martial arts.

    The first episode was shot in the Philippines, and features Master Frank Aycocho, teaching Antonio the art of Filipino unarmed combat, Kuntaw. The pilot episode is airing on youtube but the full length series will be airing on a martial arts related Web TV Network to be announced after the contracts are signed.

    “I love exotic martial arts.” Says Antonio. “The show gives me the opportunity to go anywhere I want in Asia and introduce a worldwide audience to an art that most people haven’t heard of. Kuntaw is a good example. Even in the Philippines many people don’t know about Kuntaw, and it is part of their cultural heritage.”

    Graceffo is most well-known for his work to revitalize Bokator, the Cambodian martial art, which was decimated during the Cambodian Civil War. “I have done books and articles about these martial arts, especially Bokator, but Web TV gives me a whole new forum. The power of Web TV is nearly limitless. First of all, unlike my magazine stories, it can be enjoyed by people who don’t speak English. And unlike DVDs or magazines, people can watch for free. Some of the countries where I practice are quite poor. And I am grateful that web TV provides a medium which allows the local people to watch and learn. It also instills pride in people, when they know that the whole world will be looking at their martial art.” Said Antonio.

    Currently, episodes are being filmed featuring Bradal Serey (Khmer kickboxing) and Bokator. Other shows in the works for October include Voth Vietnam, MMA, Muay Thai, Muay Boran, and Philippine grappling and kick boxing.

    “Through the power of the internet, we now have the ability to preserve all of these ancient arts and make sure that none of them fall into extinction.” Says Graceffo

    Click here to view Martial Arts Odyssey, Kuntaw http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3haZwrsY_oM

    You can contact Antonio Graceffo through his website speakingadventure.com that is Antonio@speakingadventure.com or you can join him on his myspace myspace.com/antoniobrooklynmonk






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  2. silat1

    silat1 Active Member

    kuntaw

    Kuntaw has been in the states as early as 1974 when Brian "Buzz" Smith left the Philippines and set up shop in Travis City Michigan.. Buzz is also the first Kuntawista to get Kuntaw included into a program authorized by one of the universities in the states...
    I was the first Kuntawista to bring Kuntaw into the southern part of the states after I left the Philippines in 1975 and started teaching it in Montgomery Alabama while stationed at Maxwell..

    Kuntaw has been in the states for a number of decades, but it is always good to see fresh blood bringing it in..

    Kuntaw was first developed as a fighting art, but with the later incorporation of the japanese and korean martial arts, it was made more competition friendly for tourneys..

    Buzz and his group in Michigan has been racking up tourneys and trophies when ever the Kuntaw group goes to compete.. But Buzz's Kuntaw also has a distinct combatives nature to it.

    The Kuntaw that I teach is geared primarily for use in the military and law enforcement/security fields as that has been my occupation since the early 70's.. To date, I have promoted 3 people to full instructor level in this system, although there have been others who are well qualified to teach the synthesized version of the program that was developed into the Defensive Tactics portion..


    I had posted this earlier in the same titile and thread, but it looks like it was over looked..

    Buzz and I have been busting our chops getting kuntaw/kuntao out for over half of our adult life.. We were a couple of the first pioneers to bring it out of the Philippines with our instructor's desire to pass it on to the american martial artists who were interested in training.. Buzz has been training in the Filipino Kuntaw system of Carlito Lanada since the early 70's and I started in the chinese Kuntao system in the early 70's when I moved to taiwan and from there to the Philippines.. I was away from the main school in olangapo where we were taught the older system of kuntaw before the introduction of the Japanese arts and forms into it.
    When I started, we were called Maharlika Kuntaw kungfu due to the influences of both the chinese and indonesian martial cultures.. The filipino Kuntaw meshed great with the Chinese Kuntao I learned on taiwan and I was fortunate to get instructor ranking in both the chinese and filipino versions..


    Bill

    Defensive Tactics
     
  3. kuntawguro

    kuntawguro -== Banned ==-

    Looks like you had fun in the Philippines. I did too back in the early 70's. As Bill said- it has been in the states since the early 70's and is well know in Michigan, Canada, and Illinois. Go to Kuntaw.org for more info. Any questions you may have I'd be glad to answer.
    Buzz
     
  4. wes tasker

    wes tasker New Member

    Mr. Brian & Mr. Bill -

    I hope this doesn't get into "politics" etc., but from what I've read over the years it seems that the Kuntaw as taught by Manong Lanada has changed curriculum several times... Is that an accurate statement? And if so - what are the differenced between the various incarnations?

    Also, for Bill, what was the Taiwanese system like? I practice both Kuntao and Pentjak Silat under Bapak Willem de Thouars and I'm always interested in what other "Old Hand (Lao Quan)" systems look like. Thank you.

    -wes tasker
     
  5. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    I moved a post by peatrova to here so it could get more attention!

    -Arnisador
    -FMAT Admin
     
  6. silat1

    silat1 Active Member

    Wes,
    Yes Lanada Kuntaw has changed a lot over the years, but as Buzz and I have stated, we stayed with what we were taught in the 70's. My first exposure to Kuntao was when I lived in Taiwan prior to my moving to the Philippines... When I left Taiwan, the actions of the Chinese Kuntao were without the flowery and expansive movements of the more current CMA. The Kuntao that was taught to me was taught primarily by one of the senior instructors of the Taiwanese military where I was stationed, so it was bare bones with no flowery aspects.. When I moved to the Philippines, I was looking for something similar and I found it with the Lanada Kuntaw system which at the time was called Maharlika Kuntaw Kungfu as was taught by my immediate instructor Con Turla who was the rep for the Lanada Kuntaw system in central Luzon (Pampanga region), but as the years progressed and I moved back stateside, The system went through one of the many transitions and evolutions to make it more competitive for the karate style of tourneys.. There were a lot of the old soft and circular forms tossed out for training and teaching because it didn't fit the desired effects for competition.. When I went back to the Philippines, I had to learn all the karate style forms that was included in the system at the time..

    As time progressed and I got more and more into the CMA aspects of Kuntao, I went with it more instead of staying with the karate oriented forms as taught.. This was my own chosing due to my not really going into the aspects of the more linear forms of the new Kuntaw system..

    I stayed with the name of Maharlika Kuntao to give respect to both systems of Kuntao that I have primarily trained with for most of my martial arts journey... I did this even after I resigned from the Lanada Kuntaw system due to personal differences and of my own chosing..
     
  7. wes tasker

    wes tasker New Member

    Sir-

    Thank you very much for your reply. I apperciate the history etc. One of the many things that I like about the Kuntao systems of Bapak Willem de Thouars is that they are very combative - yet very obviously Chinese systems.

    What are the forms like in the Maharlika Kuntao? The ones you learned at first. Do they have a root in some Chinese system and/or region?

    Thank you again for your reply.

    -wes tasker
     
  8. kuntawguro

    kuntawguro -== Banned ==-

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