more Imua

Discussion in 'Misc. Stick Arts' started by Imua Kuntao, Apr 29, 2008.

  1. Imua Kuntao

    Imua Kuntao New Member

    Like Others Like No OthersApr 29, '08 10:20 AM
    for everyone
    It seems that some practioners like to think that the style they do is imulated or copied from theirs. There are many similarities to be sure, however the main thing I see as a major difference is the numbering systems or the abc's of the striking patterns. Drills are found in all FMA but the differences there are how they are taught. An example is the palit-palit of Sinia-Tirsia, if you have seen this you will understand what I will say next. In Imua Tamaraw I teach first a single stick method like the mentioned, only it is the same as the single stick striking pattern of the 9 Gates System. Each trainning partner will do the same strike at the other while first standing in place according to the proper range, starting with of course the number 1 strike of the pattern, then #2, ect...... when practiced this way certain counters are seen from different ranges per certain strike. After this is practiced by students for a time (many trainning sesions), they then re-learn the same drill only using also the footwork pattern as well as the striking pattern, they then see the differences from the first time and learn more of the ranges and counters. Mean time as classes are given from the start after the student has learnd the striking pattern, they learn the blocking pattern. If you guessed that the next drill is with strikes and blocks, then you are correct, first standing then using the footwork pattern. Once they use the blocking and striking together they see passing, locks, holds, and disarms. The Palit-Palit is done with double sticks, we also teach double sticks, but again using the 9 Gates system of Imua Tamaraw and like the single stick there is a logical progression. There are many more examples using other drills such as abanicko, figure 8, banda y banda, but I will leave that for the reader to try to find and or explore.
    The name of the style I teach is Imua Tamaraw Escrima Kuntao. The style has origins from the Canonigo family system of fighting from Naga, Cebu, Phillippines. The system is also related to the Imua Shang Tang Kuntao via Tai Sifu VanDergoen, and Sijo Abrescy.
     
  2. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    Is a 'gate' a sector, like "high and right" or "middle left"?
     
  3. Imua Kuntao

    Imua Kuntao New Member

    Yes, there are nine, of course, in total. 1,2,3,and 4 form and "X", #1 from top righthand follows the angle to #2, and #2 goes up to #1. #3 starts from the lower righthand and goes up to #4 (top Lefthand). 5,6,7,and 8 form a "+". The blocking pattern is a diamond (like on the playing card), and a box, with the striking and blocking patterns are one on the other you get that universal pattern like Kenpo. Oh heck, I just let out one of the things Kenpo and FMAs have in common.
     
  4. Imua Kuntao

    Imua Kuntao New Member

    When a gate is left open, a strike could sneak in.
     
  5. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    Ah, OK, I see! It sounds like the Wing Chun system to me.
     
  6. Imua Kuntao

    Imua Kuntao New Member

    The footwork is the same nine points.
     
  7. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    OK, I think I get it! Our system is very different in Modern Arnis but I have studied enough Wing Chun previously to get the idea.
     
  8. Imua Kuntao

    Imua Kuntao New Member

    With the ability of the internet, I have been able to find several styles that are quite the same. One style, I find is Dekiti Tirsia Sirada, the numbering system is almost the same as well as the footwork pattern and some drills.
     

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