History Channel - Warriors

Discussion in 'General' started by PG Michael B, May 14, 2009.

  1. PG Michael B

    PG Michael B Oso Grande

    On the History Channel this evening host Terry Shapert will be breaking down the Alamo Scouts of WW 2...in the Philippines. The Alamo Scouts were the American guerrilla fighters, recon men etc. I am sure they will touch on the Filipino guerrilla fighters who aided them as well...and I am sure arnis will be in play..hopefully!...It is on at 9:00 pm central.
     
  2. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise Senior Member Supporting Member

    Cool! However the show usually airs at 10 pm. [​IMG]
     
  3. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    This is a great series. My kids and I watched the Hawaii episode this evening.
     
  4. PG Michael B

    PG Michael B Oso Grande

    This episode was excellent. I was a bit disappointed that they didn't cover the Filipino guerrilla fighters. Those individuals were the eyes and ears for the eyes and ears. Terry Shapert is a great host and I dig that he gets emotional. You can tell this all means something to him..it is his way and he respects and honors all of the cultures. A great show to be sure.
     
  5. Carol

    Carol <font color = blue><b>Technical Administrator</b><

    Psst...Brian...9pm Central is 10pm our time ;)
     
  6. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise Senior Member Supporting Member

    Come on Carol you know the world revolves around Eastern Standard Time![​IMG]




    It was a good show last night. Though I personally would have appreciated a little more H2H combat being shown. Still it was interesting. I did find the unarmed vs. armed sentry take down interesting in that it is a standard Krav Maga move. Which made me wonder a bit to it's authenticity in the Alamo Scouts training. Still it is an effective move so probably it is authentic. [​IMG]
     
  7. sjansen

    sjansen New Member


    Krav Maga has stolen from everyone and definately from the filipino martial arts. The best teacher is a good thief. That was teaching 101 at Western Michigan University. I would guess that almost everything in Krav Maga originated somewhere else and was conglomerated.
     
  8. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise Senior Member Supporting Member

    No doubt about that Scott. [​IMG]

    However it does make you wonder a little bit. You see they never qualified who the people doing the H2H combat were and what their credentials are so I am curious to what their training background is.
     
  9. silat1

    silat1 Active Member

    The major players in the WW2 combatives come from the Shanghai police force that was run by Major William Fairbairn, Patrick O'Neill from the British side of the Atlantic.. On the American side of the atlantic, the major player primarily was Col Rex Applegate who trained with Fairbairn when they were teaching the OSS/SOE of WW2.

    It was these individuals who laid the ground work for the majority of the combatives that are used by the British and American military before the "evolution and inclusion of the grappling crap from Brazil which is taking over the combatives of military. You also have Biddle and Styers who contributed to the evolution of military combatives before and during the war.

    . In the days before "certification and the papermills" were initiated, the proof of certification was the ability to survive and walk away from a situation while maintaining mission commitments. Krav Maga/Lotar/Kapap systems are just interpetitions and evolutions of military combatives that people culled from traditional martial arts in time of war.. Hisardut is a mixture of Kyokushinkai, judo and boxing if my memory serves me right..

    The other Israeli arts are different interpetitions from various instructors who commited to developing a viable survival combatives system that could be taught in a minimal amount of time when the need existed..

    Personally, I would rather train with some one who had the knowledge and had been in different situations where their survival was on the line and were able to teach their skills to those who needed it instead of training with individuals who had a room dedicated to their "I LUV ME" altar and ego..

    People who know what works and have proven their training in combat is better than people who worship theirselves.. Paper and certifications mean **** on the field of battle, survival and the ability to use what you have trained in will ensure that you can live to fight another day is what counts in my opinion..

    Just my .02 pesos
     
  10. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise Senior Member Supporting Member

    Thanks Bill great post. I am aware of who the major player's were during that time period. Though it is always good to reinforce who they were for our readers! [​IMG]

    Just during the Warriors show they never qualified who the people showing the H2H training were or what their qualifications were. Just a name and combat expert was put up there. Were they trained in combatives from that period? We do not know? I would have liked that information on the show. [​IMG]
     
  11. silat1

    silat1 Active Member

    I had the opportunity to pick up a book that covers the history of W.E. Fairbairn and the Shanghai years from a book company in England when I was stateside.. It was some of the most interesting reading on the CQB subject that I have had the opportunity to read in a real long time.. It outlined the training and the biography of Fairbairn and the others of the police force in Shanghai at the time.. It even covered the training that Patrick O'Neil had when he was in Japan and incorporated the training with the program that Fairbairn was working on.. Some serious research and real world applications went into the development of the program that lead to the teachings of the OSS and SOE groups of ww2..

    This book is top notch and once I dig it out again, I'll post a review of it if the interest is there
     
  12. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise Senior Member Supporting Member

    Cool that would be great. [​IMG]
     
  13. pguinto

    pguinto New Member

    What did you guys think of the 9th episode "Islands of Blood" with the Hawaiian Martial Arts/Lua, the traditional weaponry, the sledding, etc?

    Personally i thought the sledding and spear catching were wicked cool
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2009
  14. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    The sledding was neat! Now my daughter wants to try it.

    We definitely enjoyed that one. I found it a bit odd that he'd get a permanent tattoo for a TV show, though!
     
  15. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise Senior Member Supporting Member

    It was a fun episode though I wonder about much of the authenticity of what was shown or if it was recreated. Still it was a great watch! [​IMG]
     
  16. PG Michael B

    PG Michael B Oso Grande

    I think the tattoo was cool beans..I would have been honored to receive such a tattoo. I am an ink happy individual and to get one like that, in that fashion (which is a dying art)..would be a joy. It came from a warrior ilk given to a warrior..the tattoo was secondary the meaning and the brotherhood from whence it came was the crux. That episode was one of my favorites as well. I know some Lua players and they are some bad mamba jambas...and I love the camaraderie they have..that's the way it should be..that's the way I present SEAMOK...it isn't a student teacher thing only..it is a family, a tribe, etc...my students know they can come to me any time night or day and I will do my best to help them any way I can. In this mindset we build more than friendships..we build familia..tribe...brotherhood. To me that is extremely important!
     
  17. silat1

    silat1 Active Member

    Mike, That's one aspect of the FMA and Filipino culture that I enjoy the most.. It is the family atmosphere that we all get caught up into when we are training or just meeting each other for the first time.. We all have one thing in common and that is to protect our family or associates at any cost necessary when we are faced with that situation.. It is with this Dakip Diwa or warrior mindset that sets us a part from all the rest of the martial arts community.. This statement also includes the arts of southeast asia.. Where else in the world can you go and be facing a hand shake in a first time meeting and then later on down the line, facing a knife or bolo in training.. That is what makes the filipino and indonesian martial arts practitioners stand out in the crowd.. We go and do with the knowledge of our skills and are willing to share them with each other after our initial meeting.
     
  18. sjansen

    sjansen New Member

    Defendu and Kill or Be Killed are great texts to read to see the culmination of techniques from Fairbain and Applegate. If you don't own them I suggest you find them. They are currently both being reprinted though Palidin Press.
     
  19. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    Paladin Press has some great older stuff (and of course some stuff of, shall we say, less interest)!
     
  20. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    The Zulu episode of Warriors includes a decent section on their stick-fighting!
     

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