FMA Chi projectors

Discussion in 'Datu's Corner' started by Datu Tim Hartman, May 16, 2010.

  1. Datu Tim Hartman

    Datu Tim Hartman FMA Talk Founder Supporting Member

    FMA Chi blasters.I keep finding these jewels!
    [yt]7QuN50-OXpQ[/yt]
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2010
  2. Datu Tim Hartman

    Datu Tim Hartman FMA Talk Founder Supporting Member

    I think this one sums it up. Anyone want to try a no touch knock out on me? BTW, I'll be swinging a big old hunk of monster rattan!!!


    [yt]_1ykNZ7rAcw[/yt]
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2010
  3. jwinch2

    jwinch2 Member

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1ykNZ7rAcw

    These idiots are all over the internet. The video I linked does a nice job of summing up what they can and cannot do. And the guy IN the video does a nice job of summing up the group themselves.
     
  4. Datu Tim Hartman

    Datu Tim Hartman FMA Talk Founder Supporting Member

    That's the same link I was having issues posting. Now that it's up for everyone to see. Any takers to do a no touch knock out?
     
  5. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    Mr. Hartman and I always volunteer for the pressure-point KO demonstrations. We leave with black-and-blue marks from them ramping up the force, but without having been KOed.

    I believe there are useful pressure points on the body, but remain highly skeptical of the light-touch KO. Until it's done to me (or even Mr. Hartman), I'll remain skeptical.
     
  6. jwinch2

    jwinch2 Member

    I have spent the majority of my time over the past 12 years studying neuromuscular physiology and there are solid data that there are indeed useful pressure points. I have no problem with that.

    However, most of them work on the basis of pain compliance rather than the mystical effect that many espouse. Pain compliance can be very useful of course but there are times when the application of such techniques is going to give very limited return. I like them a great deal for when you have already taken someone down and do not wish to seriously hurt someone but wish to prevent them from getting up, akin to how many people use small joint manipulations to effect a pin.

    One other major way pressure points can work is by taking advantage of the mechanical properties of the muscle tendon unit. For example, you are trying to put what many non-Japanese stylists call an "S Lock" on someone. If the person you are trying to put the lock on resists by straitening the arm, that lock is very difficult to pull off effectively. However, pressure placed in the correct location on the biceps tendon can cause a sudden stretch of the muscle tendon unit which alters the contractile property of the triceps which is trying to straighten the arm. This allows a brief moment where the force of the person resisting the lock is reduced so that you can get the lock. In this case, pressure points can be a useful tool in helping one to pull off a joint lock or other technique and increase the chances of success.

    The vast majority of the time however, I do not feel that the type of response you get from pressure points is going to stop someone in their tracks during a violent assault and their utility as a stand alone strategy is minimal at best.

    As for the no touch knockout crap, it is hogwash. I will gladly stipulate that western science and medicine does not have everything figured out and there is probably much that can be learned from eastern medicine if the proper scientific rigor is applied to test them. However, I have seen nothing at all which would convince me of some mystical power to allow a no touch knock out. Complete and utter BS.
     
  7. Carol

    Carol <font color = blue><b>Technical Administrator</b><

    Can't argue with that logic :) I think pressure points and pain compliance can be helpful in controlling a person...which IMO may be one of the more underrated elements of martial arts. Naturally, controlling a person may not be the answer if your life is at risk, but there are also situations that may not need that level of threat, such as a LEO trying to take a suspect in to custody, a parent trying to control an autistic child, or a college student finding themself in an escalating squabble in the dorms.
     

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