Filipino Swords--Pictures.

Discussion in 'Misc. Sword Arts' started by arnisador, Mar 14, 2006.

  1. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    Search for your favorite Filipino sword here (e.g. ginunting):
    http://www.vikingsword.com

    Note: I have edited the specific links out of this post at the request of a user whose pictures may be being used there inappropriately.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2006
  2. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise Senior Member Supporting Member

  3. kuntawguro

    kuntawguro -== Banned ==-

  4. kabaroan

    kabaroan Kabaroan

    Reflections of Asia has some great stuff. I plan on dropping by there when I can arrange an appointment and purchase of the bolos.

    I've been there before, I had purchased a Manansala address book. Vicente Manansala is my dad's first cousin (I guess that makes us second cousins???)
     
  5. kuntawguro

    kuntawguro -== Banned ==-

  6. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    I couldn't get the second link to work, but the first link already contains a fair amount of swords!
     
  7. MPC1257

    MPC1257 New Member

  8. Labantayo

    Labantayo Junior Member


    They look like they're made in Baguio. They're also not accurate with name or form, to the blades they're supposedly trying to imitate. There's a history/description of how these swords are used up on Youtube that isnt accurate either.

    Other than that, they're nice wallhangers..
     
  9. zelbone

    zelbone Guest


    They're ok for martial artist if you're looking for a reproduction....but far from being traditional or genuine from the collector's point of view.
     
  10. Imua Kuntao

    Imua Kuntao New Member

  11. PG Michael B

    PG Michael B Oso Grande

    Nice pare..some of those look familiar..lol
     
  12. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    Some interesting knives in the last two pictures!
     
  13. Imua Kuntao

    Imua Kuntao New Member

    The last two are small Filipino and Indonesian knives, I bought the second from Guru Erik Kruk. I like to practice with all sizes, especially the ones that can be hidden easliy, yes I do have several plastic/cold steel shaped like knives which can be used if nesseccary.
     
  14. mabagani

    mabagani Pendato

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MPC1257 [​IMG]
    Here's a site that some of you might find interesting for filipino weapons.

    http://www.traditionalfilipinoweapons.com/

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Labantayo [​IMG]
    They look like they're made in Baguio. They're also not accurate with name or form, to the blades they're supposedly trying to imitate. There's a history/description of how these swords are used up on Youtube that isnt accurate either.

    Other than that, they're nice wallhangers..




    I agree, the site sells non-traditional blade forms with inaccurate descriptions from the view of collectors who have done their own research and study real old weaponry.
     
  15. kaliman1978

    kaliman1978 New Member

    ginuntings

    does anybody have a hook up on ginuntings? I know about Ron from Conneticut, but I wanted to see if there was anyone else who sells them for a better price.
     
  16. rshawtx

    rshawtx New Member

    I do beg to differ about the weapons on Ron's site. They are not wall hangers by any stretch of the imagination. They are quite functional. I say this because I own one and it *will* take a beating. I also know of others who own different items and actually use them. So as far as them being purely decorative in nature, again I beg to differ.

    I've also seen what cheap weapons are in the market place and these aren't them. Have the weapons on Ron's site been dressed up and refined so that they don't look like the cheaply made "palengke specials"... you betcha!

    With regards to the description on YouTube... I am not Tuhon's apologist. Sori. :)

    As far as their forms, I can say this. Growing up in Luzon (particularly in the southern Tagalog region), I am familiar with the Itak and can say that that is accurate. Living in Mindanao, I know the Pinute is also quite accurate. Same for the Golok/Gulok. I don't pretend to be an expert on all of them though and can only speak for the ones I've encountered growing up. If the other folks who share a differing opinion than mine can elaborate as to what constitutes the inaccuracies rather than make carte blanc statements, I for one would find it partucilarly enlightening. Gimme a for-instance. Really, I'd like to hear from you guys if you've had more exposure to them. I am not being coy or under-handed here... I will take knowledge and truth where I can find it. Even better, if you have alternate sites that sell real, authentic and *functional* (emphasis added on that last one) items I would like to see what's on offer and I am sure the proprietors would love the referral as well. It's a win-win situation all around.
     
  17. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise Senior Member Supporting Member

    Ron's ginuntings are excellent, durable and extremely functional and this is from someone who owns several from different sources. (some which are antique) [​IMG]
     
  18. kaliman1978

    kaliman1978 New Member

    Don't Trip

    I agree that Ron's blades are very nice. My training partner owns one of Ron's ginuntings and a hagabis and they are very nice and very FUNCTIONAL. I was just seeing if there was anyone who has something similar for a little less than what he charges. As far as funtionality goes that is a concern, but I'm not engaging any terrorist in the Phillipines where I would need my weapon to be highly functional. More than anything I want one for a conversation piece and something to play with from time to time when I feel the need to train with a long blade instead of my sticks.
     
  19. mabagani

    mabagani Pendato

    The erroneous "carte blanche" is the liberty to call replicas - "traditional" ...the site reveals they are made non-traditionally with modern tools and that they do not come from the perspective traditional origins.
    The descriptions are also hard to stomach for anyone who has done their own research...
    "for instance"- the kampilan is made with the hilt on *backwards* and described as a "headhunter" sword while to Moros/Muslims that would be a non-Islamic practice...and "hair added for appeal and intimidation"? also not true, it has cultural significance.
    It's a business and sure anything with a sharp edge can be made functional...but many of the hilt and blade forms verge on fantasy and the info may have been written to sell products...
    Doesn't really help this generation and the next searching for truth and facts.
    It comes down to preference, I collect antiques and do my own research, once and awhile I'll pick up newer blades if they're well made and from their point of origin, win-win, being money goes to local makers/economies and keeps the traditional arts alive. So I have a bolo from Ilocos, sansibar from the Visayas, kalis from Sulu, head ax from the Mountain Province, etc...
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2008
  20. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise Senior Member Supporting Member

    I would agree on some of the descriptions being off and some of the blades being different than designs I am more familiar with. Still he does have some excellent blades on there. The ginunting is just one example.
     

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