DLO: "Die Less Often 4" and "Die Less Often 5"

Discussion in 'Dog Brothers Martial Arts' started by Crafty Dog, Nov 28, 2015.

  1. Crafty Dog

    Crafty Dog Active Member

    We are in the process of releasing "Die Less Often 4: Trauma Care" and "Die Less Often 5: Close Quarter Gun Fighting", both of which feature Frankie McRae

    Who is Frankie McRae?

    This here from the description for the DBMA Camp that Frankie and I did together a few years ago at his gun range in Fayetteville, NC with regard to his day teaching Trauma Care.
    ========================================================

    Who is Frankie?

    Frank McRae is the former head of the US Army Special Forces Advanced Reconnaissance Target Analysis and Exploitation Techniques Course (SFARTAETC) at Ft. Bragg N.C. He started his military career in the 1st Ranger Bn as an 11B infantryman. He served in the 1st Special Forces Group (ABN) Okinawa Japan, in Cco 1st Bn. 1st SFG(A) (C-1-1) where he was an assault team leader for F team,Troop 1 in the Combatant Commanders In-extremis Force (CIF) conducting operations in Operation Enduring Freedom. Advising, training and standing up the Light Reaction Company of the Armed Forces of the Phillipines (AFP). He was then assigned as an Instructor to the SFARTAETC at the Special Warfare Center and School in Ft. Bragg NC, was promoted and became the NCOIC of the course and awarded for having the highest graduation rate for the course in it's twenty year history . He also served as a Troop SGM Troop 1 and Team SGT ODA-354 in B co 2nd Bn 3rd SFG(A) CIF in IRAQ as an Iraqi Counter-Terrorism Force (ICTF) Company SGM advisor and combat leader on many missions in Iraq and also attended the Israeli Counter-Terrorism Course as an exchange instructor.

    For those of us not familiar with the acronyms with which the Army loves to speak, allow me to break this down a bit (for surely Frankie is too humble to do it himself). Frankie is a Green Beret who after extensive experience leading units in firefights in Iraq and elsewhere taught advanced firearms to his fellow Green Berets at Fort Bragg, which is one of the major bases for Green Beret/Special Forces training. As the Non-Com Officer in Charge (NCOIC) he had the highest graduation rate for the course in its history. In other words, not only does the man have a wealth of combat experience, he is one helluva a teacher as well, deeply experienced in the ways of teaching people to successfully operate in extreme adrenal state of a firefight.

    THIS IS A VERY RARE COMBINATION and the opportunity to take advantage of training with such a man is one to be taken.

    The Camp will be for three days: July 13-15. The cost for all three days is $400. Day One may be taken separately for $150. Days Two and Three can be taken for $300.

    DAY ONE: TRAUMA CARE. Among his many talents, Frankie is an “18 Delta”. An 18 Delta is a Special Forces Medical Sergeant and quite a bit more; his talents include teaching others how to do trauma care e.g. what to do when you or someone else is shot, stabbed, or cut until proper medical care is available.

    Here is the course description for the day— With some adaptations based upon civilian realities it is based closely upon 1 Day Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) TSE-NRBL-100. TCCC is quickly becoming the standard of care for the tactical management of combat casualties within the Department of Defense and is the sole standard of care dually endorsed by both the American College of Surgeons and the National Association of EMT’s for casualty management in tactical environments.

    TCCC is built around three definitive phases of casualty care:

    Care Under Fire:

    Care rendered at the scene of the injury while both the medic and the casualty are under hostile fire. Available medical equipment is limited to that carried by each operator and the medic and you or someone else needs fast medical care.

    Tactical Field Care:

    Rendered once the casualty is no longer under hostile fire. Medical equipment is still limited to that carried into the field by mission personnel. Time prior to evacuation may range from a few minutes to many hours. This will involve stabilizing a patient until medical care arrives and you are then able to assist the medical personnel because correct lifesaving measures have already been rendered to the patient.

    Tactical Evacuation Care (TACEVAC):

    Rendered while the casualty is evacuated to a higher echelon of care. Any additional personnel and medical equipment pre-staged in these assets will be available during this phase. This module will not be covered at the Camp.

    This one-day course covers the Care under fire and Tactical Field care phases for soldiers that are isolated or in small units away from medical assistance, using small bags that have minimal equipment. (see e.g. http://dogbrothers.com/store/product_info.php… )

    What that means for us is that under Frankie’s supervision your training will including doing cricothyroidotomies on pig windpipes and chest wound seals on pig ribs. This is training that truly maximizes your ability to remember what to do and have the confidence to do it should you ever need it!!! There will be NO LIVE ANIMALS USED FOR THIS TRAINING!

    ===================================================

    Also, check out Frankie herein beginning at 22:00

    http://www.warriortalkradio.com/…/tonight-celebrate-legend…/#
     
  2. Crafty Dog

    Crafty Dog Active Member

    Doctor Dog writes:

    I just finished reviewing the new trauma care offering as the latest installment of the DLO series. As a former military doctor, I have completed the Combat Casualty Care Course (C4) and spent plenty of hours moonlighting in the ER, but if you don't use skills regularly you lose them so a couple years ago I attended this seminar taught by Frankie McRae, and found it extremely practical and useful. The new algorithms being taught to the combat medics now as a result of all our recent casualty experience frankly make a lot more sense than what I was taught years ago. The material is stepwise, logical and accessible. The emphasis on material that is most likely to be useful was good. The section on what to have with you or readily accessible is very good. It made me rethink my personal preparedness and I now almost always have an IFAK with an additional self applicable tourniquet and nasal airway, small flashlight and blade in a small bag with me. I made that decision and commitment after attending this seminar.

    Statistically, you are far more likely at some point in your life to be dealing with the aftermath of a traumatic injury, be it bullet, blade, chainsaw, automobile, lawnmower, etc, than you are to be pulling out your gun or knife in self defense, and the person injured is likely to be you or a loved one. If you carry a gun or a blade but do not have ready access to some sort of medical kit and the training to use it, you may want to reconsider priorities (again, statistically speaking). This video is an excellent place to start. I highly recommend it.
     
  3. Crafty Dog

    Crafty Dog Active Member

    NOW AVAILABLE!



    Now Available For Download! https://gumroad.com/l/dlo4

    "Statistically, you are far more likely at some point in your life to be dealing with the aftermath of a traumatic injury, be it bullet, blade, chainsaw, automobile, lawnmower, etc, than you are to be pulling out your gun or knife in self defense, and the person injured is likely to be you or a loved one.

    "I just finished reviewing the new "Trauma Care" offering as the latest installment of the "DieLess Often" series. As a former military doctor, I have completed the Combat Casualty Care Course (C4) and have spent plenty of hours moonlighting in the ER, but if you don't use skills regularly you lose them. In that spirit a couple years ago I attended this seminar taught by Frankie McRae, and found it extremely practical and useful.

    "The new algorithms being taught to the combat medics now as a result of all our recent casualty experience frankly make a lot more sense than what I was taught years ago. I would add that the content is logical and easily understood by non-medical people. The emphasis on material that is most likely to be useful (improvised if necessary) was quite good.

    "For those willing to go the extra mile and have a kit with them (e.g. in the glove box of their car, and/or at home) the section on what to have with you or readily accessible is very good. Even as a M.D. It made me rethink my personal preparedness. I now almost always have a kit with an additional self applicable tourniquet and nasal airway, small flashlight and blade in a small bag with me. I made that decision and commitment after attending this seminar."

    "Dr. Rick "Doctor Dog" Laue, M.D"

    Many of us work on skills with guns, knives, and other weapons and tools that make holes in people, yet few of us work on the skills of keeping people with those holes alive until higher medical authority arrives. Now with this approximately three hour Download, you have "Trauma Care with Frankie McRae".

    Well, who is Frankie McRae?

    Frankie is an 18 Delta (Special Forces Combat Medic). He is the former head of the US Army Special Forces Advanced Reconnaissance Target Analysis and Exploitation Techniques Course (SFARTAETC) at Ft. Bragg N.C. He started his military career in the 1st Ranger Bn as an 11B infantryman. He served in the 1st Special Forces Group (ABN) Okinawa Japan, in Cco 1st Bn. 1st SFG(A) (C-1-1) where he was an assault team leader for F team,Troop 1 in the Combatant Commanders In-extremis Force (CIF) conducting operations in Operation Enduring Freedom. Advising, training and standing up the Light Reaction Company of the Armed Forces of the Phillipines (AFP). He was then assigned as an Instructor to the SFARTAETC at the Special Warfare Center and School in Ft. Bragg NC, was promoted and became the NCOIC of the course and awarded for having the highest graduation rate for the course in it's twenty year history . He also served as a Troop SGM Troop 1 and Team SGT ODA-354 in B co 2nd Bn 3rd SFG(A) CIF in IRAQ as an Iraqi Counter-Terrorism Force (ICTF) Company SGM advisor and combat leader on many missions in Iraq and also attended the Israeli Counter-Terrorism Course as an exchange instructor.

    For those of us not familiar with the acronyms with which the Army loves to speak, allow me to break this down a bit (for surely Frankie is too humble to do it himself). Frankie is a Green Beret who after extensive experience leading units in firefights in Iraq, Afghanistan, and elsewhere taught advanced firearms to his fellow Green Berets at Fort Bragg, which is one of the major bases for Green Beret/Special Forces training. As the Non-Com Officer in Charge (NCOIC) he had the highest graduation rate for the course in its history. In other words, not only does the man have a wealth of combat experience, he is one helluva a teacher as well, deeply experienced in the ways of teaching people to successfully operate in extreme adrenal state of a firefight. THIS IS A VERY RARE COMBINATION and the opportunity to learn from such a man is one to be taken.

    As the headlines of our newspapers and the news programs on our TVs repeatedly attest, the flying fickle finger of fate can reach out and touch any of us at any moment be it through violence or by mishap. When you are faced with someone wounded or injured, will you have skills to bring to bear or not? With this Download/DVD you will be moving yourself forward in your readiness for such a moment.
     
  4. Crafty Dog

    Crafty Dog Active Member

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