Dekiti Tirsia Siradas.

Discussion in 'Dekiti Tirsia Siradas' started by arnisador, Jul 19, 2006.

  1. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    I got to do some of this with Mike Snow today. We haven't gotten together for a while due to my traveling out of town for 10 months for work. We played with the knife with the blade in reverse position (blade facing the arm rather than out). Of course, since we haven't seen one another for a while, we also chatted more than we should have! With luck, the Grandmaster will be back in Indiana for a visit soon.

    There's a lot of interesting stuff in this detailed system. It's heavily blade-oriented, which sometimes necessitates a change of mindset for a stick-centered person like me.
     
  2. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    It was nice to see Mr. Snow again recently and to see some more DTS! It's great stuff.
     
  3. Kali Cowboy

    Kali Cowboy New Member

    I too, have recently had some time learning the way of DTS. The footwork is more natural than the FMA that I have been practicing for years. I like it very much. I had a great time with Grand Master, John Bednarski, Mike Snow, Karl, Shawn, Brian and the rest of the gang that was in Chicago for the camp. I look forward to the end of July, as I am hosting GM and Mike Snow for a few days. I really like this system. I plan to continue to host my instructors here in Florida. I also owe a lot to my teacher, Master Style, for his help getting me ready for the camp. Our FMA is filled with a lot of great people all of whom I am glad to know. I actually met, Karl, from Germany and, Shawn, from Canada at the hotel and the three of us hit it off! We had a great time hanging out and training. We are posting some pictures on one of the other DTS threads so check them out.
    God Bless,
    Stephen
     
  4. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    The footwork requires a lot of thought for me--but when it works, your position is excellent!
     
  5. medic

    medic Junior Member

    The footwork does take awhile to get used to, especially if you are used to other systems. The Chicago camp was a blast, thanks to John and his students. A special thanks to my two main training partners Karl and Steve, who had a lot of patience with me as this was my first exposure to this system. Grandmaster Nene was a joy to watch and he also exhibits a lot of patience with new students like myself. One thing I will never forget though is the help of Karl and Steve reminding me to keep doing the footwork properly in the applications and GM Nene's constant reminder to "get out, get out". If anyone is in the Chicago area drop into Midway Kodenkan and talk to John and Jose about classes, you won't be disappointed. Also had the pleasure of meeting Mike Snow who has been a wealth of information both by email and telephone for me over the last few months.

    Shaun
     
  6. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise Senior Member Supporting Member

    Yes it does. Slightly different than what I am used to. [​IMG]
     
  7. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    Yes, he's a great resource--I'm lucky to have him in town!
     
  8. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise Senior Member Supporting Member

    That is cool! [​IMG]
     
  9. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    I still have to upload some pics from the Terre Haute camp!
     
  10. Boz

    Boz Kailat Kombatives Student

    I recently had the honor of training with GM Nene. It is a great system and he is a top-notch martial artist even at age 71. I agree with the comments about the footwork. I didn't realize how sloppy my footwork was until I trained with GM Nene. I look forward to learning more of the DTS system.
     
  11. R. Mike Snow

    R. Mike Snow Chiseled Edge

    Hey Boz, don't forget you are always welcome to stop here in Terrible Haute to train and if we get lucky enough "Arnisador" will have a free spot of his calendar too.
     
  12. Boz

    Boz Kailat Kombatives Student

    Thanks Mike! I may have to take you up on that. How far was the drive? About 2 hours?
     
  13. R. Mike Snow

    R. Mike Snow Chiseled Edge

    I hate to admit it Boz, but I think it took about 3 hours to get up to Ball State campus. But a half hour of it or so was because we had no idea where we were going. I normally buz on by the Muncie exit on my way to Sifu / Guro Keith's though. So that helped to get us that far real quick. I was really impressed with Muncie and the campus too. Nice place, I suggest to everyone now that it's a great place to visit and participate in a seminar. The food was great too........love thos Chinese sesame balls. I think I only ate eleven or twelve of them, but who's counting???

    If I know way in advance anyone's coming I normallywhip up a feast, just ask John, Sifu David and 'Anisador '. Hope it's not to obvious I'm craving real food, this hospital food SUCKS.
     
  14. Tunnel_Rat

    Tunnel_Rat New Member

    Dont forget footwork also means changing levels. By that I mean going down on one knee, kneeling, and lying down, kinda like the romans did when they ate. footwork, techniques, and changing levels to me gives 3 dimentions to work with and each one changes the dynamic of what you are doing. Last year when I lived with Tuhon Nene for 2 months taught me among other things how important changing levels can be.
     

Share This Page