Deadly Arts.

Discussion in 'Misc. Stick Arts' started by arnisador, Mar 1, 2008.

  1. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    I saw on MT a post about this series running on fitTV with Josette Normandeau as host. I watched the episode on Kalaripayattu, which featured a lot of wooden and metallic weapons training, including staves, clubs, swords and shields, and an odd two-pronged cross between a sword and a whip. I amright now watching the episode on capoeira.

    I missed the episode on savate which evidently included a fair amount of la canne. I'll keep watching Deadly Arts--it's a pretty good series so far! The host is from a Shotokan and Aikido background but tries different arts each week.
     
  2. gagimilo

    gagimilo Member

    I saw the savate episode and liked it quite a bit, especially the historical reconstruction of some of the events that have defined those particular methods in one way or another. Being that I have done some serious la canne lessons during my trips to France, I would say that it is well portrayed.

    Tha same stands for the Muay Thai episode, in which I was especially pleasantly surprised with host's dedication and commitment to make the show as best as possible, even if it meant some extraordinary effort and strain oh her side. Also, that episode gives a nice highlight of the weapon portion in Thai arts - Krabi Krabong.
     
  3. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    Yeah, I'm hoping they'll repeat the ones I've missed!
     
  4. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    Just as stated above, the "Muay Thai" episode, which I just watched, has a fair amount of Krabi Krabong swordwork, including stick training for practice. There was tire training with the sticks as well!

    I'm definitely enjoying this series.
     
  5. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    I just finished the Savate episode and it featured a fair amount of la canne. Some of it was extremely fencing-oriented but other techniques, esp. from the self-defense oriented Savate Defense, was so familiar that if I had been told that this was a French Modern Arnis group practicing then I would have believed it. There was a clear #3 disarm, a striking pattern that was essentially our first five strikes, and it looked like any other FMA with kicks inspired by (the Savate-influenced) art of JKD.

    Of all the Fight Quest/Human Weapon/Sport Science/etc. shows on now, this is surely my favorite! Of course, there are still the "challenge matches" and sped-up motion and some cheesy re-enactments of olden in times (in this episode in particular), but I find it quite enjoyable. Recommended!
     
  6. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise Senior Member Supporting Member

    This definately is a fun series to watch! The only one I have not seen is the Aikido one which is supposed to be a little controversial so I want to check that one out.
     
  7. gagimilo

    gagimilo Member

    Speaking of la canne - the modern sport version is considerably diferent to one taught few decades back. Namely, it is not fencing derived to such degree (especially realting to grip and striking portion of the stick) and is much more lively in footwork and body movement in general. Also, it is not unusual to see fighters changing their stick-wielding hands in mid action, either as a feint or in order to reach an open target.
    I trained in la canne during my trips to France and happen to like it quite a bit, as it is great for one's conditioning and is more joviel/funny to practice that FMA, i.e. the atmosphere is not trying to prepare you for real world combat, but rather for sports. However, it is that same thing that makes me like FMA more in general...
     
  8. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    How flexible are those canes? They look whip-like!
     
  9. Scarab

    Scarab New Member

    Bonjour,
    It's normal, if some techniques from the savate defense seemed so familiar to you, because a lot of these techniques developped by Robert Paturel (the guy with white hair, former champion of savate and trainer of the french police special force RAID) are influenced by FMA.
    In this show, in the savate defense sequence, the guy, bald in black, with the balisong, who attacked Josette... it was me!
     
  10. Brian R. VanCise

    Brian R. VanCise Senior Member Supporting Member

    Cool! I definately enjoyed this episode and the sequence you were in. On another note I am looking at getting some savate la canne body armor and sparring sticks so if you know a place to purchase it that would be much appreciated.
     
  11. gagimilo

    gagimilo Member

    Well, I have been told there that the sticks are made of chestnut tree, and I am actually not aware of place to buy them...just go an make your own. As one of the advanced practitioners in the club where I trained explained, you should actually cut some saplings to make those, as that way you'll end up with a nice straight stick. It is thinner than those used in FMA (say, around 1/2 of an inch) and longer too.
    In my experience they were not all that flexible, at least not to the degree that arnisador mentioned. Still, in training and sport matches one is not allowed to use follow-through strokes, just the retracting ones, and the speed of action could make it seem like more flexible that it really is...
     
  12. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    That was you! Cool! Now I know someone famous. :) I noticed the balisong. It's neat to know that the material is indeed FMA-influenced. It looked like the system was well thought out, though of course it was only a brief segment.

    Do you practice sport savate (le boxe francaise) also?

    Edit: I just went back and watched that sequence again. You even got three speaking lines: "Ooosh," "ooo-ooosh", and "Oosh"!
     
  13. arnisador

    arnisador Active Member

    Thanks for the info.! It was hard for me to tell on the TV.

    Ah, I hadn't picked up on that. I suppose that keeps some of the fencing "feel" of the sport?
     
  14. gagimilo

    gagimilo Member

    Yes, especially when you consider the position of the hand and wrist upon contact when striking. Namely, if one were holding a blade, the striking portion would be the flat of the blade. Don't ask me why...
     

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