1-12 drills

Discussion in 'Lameco' started by gagimilo, Jan 25, 2009.

  1. gagimilo

    gagimilo Member

    I have once found a reference to Lameco drills Uno-Doce on the web-site run by guro/sifu Ben Fajardo, and he was attributing those explanations to gure Ron Balicki. However, from his description I couldn't really figure out what types of strikes he was using in those combos, so I wondered if someone here might provide some clarification...

    Here's the desription, as found on Mr, Fajardo's Nubreed site:

    [FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Sans Serif][FONT=Arial,Helvetica,Sans Serif]Escrima Drills Uno - Doce

    Uno- diagonal strike w/upper thrust at same line w/stepping

    Dos- diagonal down from closed to thrust

    Tres- horizontal to small circle vertical downward

    Cuatro- backhand small circle vertical downward

    Sinco- (from open position)- forehand lobtik to big circle backhand witik

    Saez- Forehand lobtik (big double circle) forehand lobtik- backhand lobtik

    Siete- forehand sweep block- small circle strike to hand-backhand diagonal to head-
    big circle strike to knee same side

    Osto- Horizontal strike cut- (H-M-L)
    a. diagonal strike down/up
    b. upward diagonal up/down

    Nueve- Horizontal strike to elbow-vertical to head

    Diez- upward eight

    Unce- diagonal upward/vertical downward

    Doce- double vertical big circles downward

    Free lance the drills and combine then together
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  2. Guro Dave Gould

    Guro Dave Gould LAMECO ESKRIMA SYSTEM

    Eskrima drills.

    Dragan,

    Hello, I hope that all is well with you and that you are training with intention. Now to respond to your thread.

    The "1-12 drills" which you are referring to are actually the "Eskrima Drills" in Lameco Eskrima. Actually there are 4 sets in Lameco Eskrima; "Eskrima Drills", "Kali Drills", "Lameco Drills" and the "Amarra Drills" taught in that order.

    Actually these are not "drills" in the traditional sense of the word requiring two people to exchange a coreographed series of redundant orchestrated strikes and counters, but rather they are a method of grouping strikes and combinations of strikes in a non-compliant environment against a random unexpected attack and counter attacks. Forcing the student to rely on perception & reaction, location & relocation principles and counter to counter as well as recovery measures performed in real time.

    98 percent of the material represented in these 4 series of grouping strikes come directly from De campo Uno-Dos-Tres Orehenal as taught by Manong Jose D. Caballero.

    Judging from what is detailed above it appears that for some reason Mr. Fajardo and Ron Baliki are using "Inosanto" terminology, below I have written the names and instructions on how to perform each "Eskrima Drill" as it was taught to us in Lameco Eskrima terminology by Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite:

    ESKRIMA DRILLS:

    Eskrima Uno -
    Pahandag at sak-sak paakyat (bukas):

    #1 strike with upward diagonal thrust back to starting position (same line).

    Eskrima Dos -
    pahandag at sak-sak paakyat (pinid):

    #4 strike with upward diagonal thrust back to starting position (same line).

    Eskrima Tres -
    patalon at bagsak (bukas):

    #1 "patalon" strike (broken / hit-&-bounce) bounce back to the high open position and follow immediately with a fluid #12 strike, ending on the right side (high open position).

    Eskrima Kuwatro -
    patalon at bagsak (pinid):

    #4 "patalon" strike (broken / hit-&-bounce) bounce back to the high closed position and follow immediately with a fluid #12 strike (closed), ending on the left side (high closed position).

    Eskrima Singko -
    patalon, bagsak, at pahandag:

    #1 "patalon" strike (broken / hit-&-bounce) bounce back to the high open position and follow immediately with a fluid #12 strike, ending on the right side (high open position) and follow up with a fluid #1 strike, ending on the left side (high closed position). #4 "patalon" strike (broken / hit-&-bounce) bounce back to the high closed position and follow immediately with a fluid #12 strike (closed), ending on the left side (high closed position) and finish with a fluid #4 strike ending on the right side (high open position).

    Eskrima Saez -
    patalon, doble-bagsak, at pahandag:

    #1 "patalon" strike (broken / hit-&-bounce) bounce back to the high open position and follow immediately with double fluid #12 strikes, ending on the right side (high open position) and follow up with a fluid #1 strike ending on the left side (high closed position). #4 "patalon" strike (broken / hit-&-bounce) bounce back to the high closed position and follow immediately with double fluid #12 strikes (closed), ending on the left side (high closed position) and finish with a fluid #4 strike ending on the right side (high open position).

    Eskrima Siete -
    patalon, bagsak, at doblete:

    #1 "patalon" strike (broken / hit-&-bounce) bounce back to the high open position and follow immediately with a fluid #12 strike, ending on the right side (high open position) and follow up with fluid double #1 strikes ending on the left side (high closed position). #4 "patalon" strike (broken / hit-&-bounce) bounce back to the high closed position and follow immediately with a fluid #12 strike (closed), ending on the left side (high closed position) and finish with double fluid #4 strikes ending on the right side (high open position).

    Eskrima Otso -
    Kombinasyon saplansada at dalawahan:

    a)- #7 & #6 "plansada" strikes (horizontal, same line).
    b)- #1 & #2 "dalawahan" strikes (down and upper diagonal, same line).
    c)- #4 & #3 "dalawahan" strikes (down and upper diagonal, same line).

    Eskrima Nueve -
    plansada at bagsak:

    Begin with a fluid #6 strike followed by & fluid #12 strike (ending in the high open position); fluid #7 strike followed by a fluid #12 strike (ending in the high closed position).

    Eskrima Diez –
    palong paakyat (Ikis):

    Upward fluid #3 strike followed by an upward fluid #2 strike (upward "X" strikes)

    Eskrima Unce
    -
    palong paakyat at bagsak:

    Upward fluid #3 strike, followed with a fluid #12 strike ending in the low closed position, followed by an upward fluid #2 strike and ending with a fluid #12 strike in the low open position.

    Eskrima Doce -
    bagsak at pahandag:

    Starting from the high open position strike a fluid #12 strike ending in the high open position and follow through with a fluid #1 strike ending in the high closed position, then strike a fluid #12 strike ending in the high closed position and follow through with a fluid #4 strike ending in the high open position.

    Train well, ciao.

    Guro Dave Gould.
     
  3. Guro Dave Gould

    Guro Dave Gould LAMECO ESKRIMA SYSTEM

    Eskrima & Kali Drills on Video.

    Dragan,

    Hello, I would just like to add that both the "Eskrima Drills" & "Kali Drills" are both available on Video and I believe on DVD now. They were shot in the early 90`s through Unique publications Video (Inside Kung-Fu) featuring Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite and they can currently be purchased through Mrs. Felisa Sulite at:

    www.LamecoEskrima.com

    "Essential Single Stick Skills" (vol.1):

    This video covers "Eskrima Drills" 1-12 in the series, with valuable insights, tips and application for each of the 12 groupings.

    "Essential Single Stick Skills" (vol.2):

    This video covers "Kali Drills" 1-12 in the series with valuable insights, tips and application for each of the 12 groupings.

    The "Lameco Drills" & "Amarras Drills" were considered to be highly confidential reserved only for Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulites most dedicated students and were never released to the public in seminar or video format.

    I highly recommend the "Essential Single Stick Skills" video series to all who want to understand better the essence of Lameco Eskrima and the significance of De Campo Uno-Dos-Tres Orehenal & the profound influence that Manong Jose D. Caballero had on Lameco Eskrima as a whole.

    Go well, ciao.

    Guro Dave Gould.
     
  4. gagimilo

    gagimilo Member

    As usual, you were of great help! also, thanx for the recommendation, I'll get on finding the videos ASAP...
     
  5. BSnyder

    BSnyder New Member

    Hi,

    Where do these drills appear in the Lameco solo Baston curriculum?, I'm not familar with Lameco and I was curious as to what the solo baston progression is.

    Thanks,
    Bruce
     
  6. gagimilo

    gagimilo Member

    Yeah, this is a good question! In the meantime I have obtained the videos of PG Sulite, which are excellent resources. Still, Bruce has a good inquiry, as I would also like to know where and when in the learning progression do these drills come in?
     
  7. Guro Dave Gould

    Guro Dave Gould LAMECO ESKRIMA SYSTEM

    Hi guys,

    I hope that all are well and that everyone is keeping quite challenged by their daily training. Now to respond to your queries.

    Both the "Eskrima Drills" & the "Kali Drills" are first introduced in the beginner level of "Masugid". They are again introduced with alertness training and modifications in the intermediate level of "Marunong". They are again introduced with finishing strikes and group mixing in the advanced level of "Bihasa".

    Through the progressions both the "Eskrima Drills" & the "Kali Drills" are applied to the weapon combinations of; Solo-Baston, Doble-Baston, Dos manos largos, Espada, Espada-y-Daga & Solo Daga.

    I hope that this helps, ciao.

    Regards,
    Guro Dave Gould.
     
  8. BSnyder

    BSnyder New Member

    Thank you sir, that was very helpful.

    I had a few more questions about the solo baston, do these Eskrima and Kali drills come before or after the 12 basic numbering system? also where do the Laban laro fit in? You used different grading terms, could you outline the grading levels in Lameco?

    Thanks,
    Bruce
     
  9. Guro Dave Gould

    Guro Dave Gould LAMECO ESKRIMA SYSTEM

    Lameco Eskrima Rank Structure:

    1) Unang Baitang (beginner level)

    a) Bagong pasok (aspirant)
    b) Baguhan (beginner)
    c) Masugid (dedicated)
    d) Masipag (earnest)

    2) Ikalawang Baitang (intermediate level)

    a) May-alam (seeds of knowledge)
    b) Marunong (knowledgeable)
    c) Mahusay (skillful)

    3) Ikatlong Baitang (advanced level)

    a) Magaling (highly skilled)
    b) Bihasa (expert)
    c) Batikan (certified expert)
    d) Apprentice Instructor

    4) Ika-apat na Baitang (trainer level)

    a) Tagapagsanay (asst. instructor)
    b) Tagapagturo (senior asst. instructor)
    c) Kabakas ng Tagapagturo (associate instructor)

    5) Ika-limang Baitang (instructor level)

    a) Guro (full instructor)
    b) Senior Instructor
    c) Chief Instructor

    6) Master Instructor
     
  10. Guro Dave Gould

    Guro Dave Gould LAMECO ESKRIMA SYSTEM

    Bruce,

    The Abecedario (12 basic strikes) start in the beginner level of Bagong Pasok and continue through the avanced level of Batikan. We have 12 different variations of our Alphabeto Abecedario from most basic to most advanced and a few progressions are taught through out different stages of the training curriculum.

    The first set of Laban-laro (Solo-Baston) are taught in the beginner level of Baguhan. There are different sets introduced at different stages of the curriculum from Baguhan to Batikan.

    Train well, ciao.

    Regards,
    Guro Dave Gould
     
  11. long range

    long range New Member

    Dear Guro Dave,
    great post.I have been looking for info on the Lameco Eskrima curriculum for a long time.please would it be possible to gain some insight into Lameco's weapons taught to Individuals(Impact/Bladed)and at what stage of training is bladed weapons taught?.Would it also be possible to obatin information on Lameco's empty Hand curriculum?
    Thank you,
    Long Range.
     
  12. Guro Dave Gould

    Guro Dave Gould LAMECO ESKRIMA SYSTEM

    Long range,

    Hello, I hope that all is well with you and that your training is keeping you quite challenged. now to respond to your query.

    Lameco Eskrima is rather unique as compared to other Pilipino Warrior Arts. The system is presented with the understanding that the weapon or weapon combination is not important, rather the foundation and knowledge is and can be applied to anything which can be lifted from the ground and held in the human hand. So as opposed to the "weapon", the "knowledge" is emphasized and this is reflected in how the system is taught. As Lameco Eskrima is not taught as other traditional Pilipino Warrior Art systems where you start with the stick, then go to the double stick, then to the long stick, then to the knife, double knife etc... In Lameco Eskrima the knowledge is presented, dissected and translated to the strength of the weapon or weapon combination equally from day one with out preference to weapon nomenclature.

    On any given day regardless of where we were in the curriculum we would train with knife, stick, sword or empty-hand. Punong Guro Sulite used to say that Lameco Eskrima was not a knife fighting system, nor was it a stick fighting system or a sword fighting system, but rather a combative system which could be used with what ever instrument that could be held in the human hand to the point of having nothing and then implementing the knowledge bone to bone. He used to say that he could teach you the entire system being armed only with a knife, a stick, a sword or empty-hand. In Lameco Eskrima the weapon is not a tangible one perse, but rather a mental one, as the knife, stick or sword are merely extensions of the mind. The human mind is the weapon and ones greatest resource in a combative venue, regardless of what is being used to implement ones deadly intent.

    So from the beginner level of "Bagong Pasok" to the advanced level of "Batikan", Punong Guro Sulite would introduce all of the various weapon combinations found within our training curriculum, day by day on a case by case basis and emphasize their strength in training the material presented. I hope that this helps.

    Train well, ciao.

    Regards,
    Guro Dave Gould.
     
  13. Guro Dave Gould

    Guro Dave Gould LAMECO ESKRIMA SYSTEM

    Hi guys,

    I felt the need to expound on what I wrote above. When Punong Guro Sulite would teach a class he would present material to the class from the curriculum in the form of combative technique, concept or principle. Then he would illustrate the technique, concept or principle with a knife, stick, sword or empty-hand as he emphasized the strengths of each probable weapon individually.

    For example, lets say that the days lesson was non-telegraphic striking. Punong Guro Sulite would present the combative principle and demonsrate the function first with a stick, exploring point of perception to point of contact to recovery measures. Then he would look at the class and try to remove any excess movement which announced intent from each participant of the class. Once he was satisfied with the classes execution he would move on and demonstrate the principle with the knife. Since the way that you would strike with a knife is different than with a stick he would address the nuances of delivery and differences of recovery, emphasizing the strength which a knife brings to the combative equation over a stick or any other weapon alike. Then he would address the principle with a sword, then with empty-hand followed by any other weapon or weapon combination which we have in our training curriculum.

    At the end of the class or progression of classes the student leaves with a complete functional understanding of the technique, concept or principle presented and more importantly be able to actualize that knowledge and implement it with what ever weapon or weapon combination which may be accessible in ones time in need. To the point of having no weapon or instrument available and having to implement that knowledge bone to bone. Again in Lameco Eskrima knowledge and fundamentals are of most value over preference of weapon or weapon value.

    Regards,
    Guro Dave Gould.
     
  14. long range

    long range New Member

    Dear Guro Dave,

    Thank you for taking the time to reply to my post.It's great to learn more about Lameco Eskrima and the foundtions that Punong Guro Sulite layed down for individulas to follow.Please would it be possible to gain some information on the bladed weapons that are part of Lameco Eskrima.Does Lameco use the Balisong,Barong,Kampilan,pinuti,kerambit within the curriculum?Would it also be possible to inform to me when the intergration of Empty Hand and Weapons come together to combine striking methods with the atomical weapons and Impact/Edged weapons.

    Thank you
    Long Range.
     
  15. Guro Dave Gould

    Guro Dave Gould LAMECO ESKRIMA SYSTEM

    Long Range,

    We trained with all weapons found in our curriculum in the earliest stages of the beginner level, from "Bagong Pasok" to "Masipag", to include empty-hand. These weapons are: Solo-Baston (single stick), Doble-Baston (double stick), Dos Manos Largos (48" long stick), Baraw (Knife), Doble-Baraw (double knife), Itak (Sword), Itak-at-Baraw (Sword & Knife), Buto-Buto / Mano-Mano (Empty hand), Mga sandata ng pagkakataon (weapons of opportunity).

    We continue training the weapons listed above, to include empty hand, through out the curriculum to the Advanced level of "Batikan". The edged weapons favored by Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite in Lameco Eskrima were the "Batangas" Knife (Balisong), Baraw (knife from Waray), Pinuti & Ginunting (swords from Visayas) and Bolo (Machete).

    I hope that this has been helpful to you.

    Train well, ciao.

    Regards,
    Guro Dave Gould.
     
  16. long range

    long range New Member

    Dear Guro Dave,
    Thank you for your reply and the information that you furnished me with.

    Regards,
    Long Range.
     
  17. Guro Dave Gould

    Guro Dave Gould LAMECO ESKRIMA SYSTEM

    Long Range,

    You are quite welcome! If you have any further questions regarding Lameco Eskrima or Punong Guro Edgar G. Sulite please feel free to ask.

    After years of training this system under the astute tuteledge of Punong Guro Sulite, the one thing that was made very clear to me was to always question the status quo, and profoundly challenge the impossible. As long as we remain challenged in our daily training we will continue to increase in skill, should we become complacent in our training at best we will stagnate or worse decrease in skill.

    Train as if your life depends on it... because one day it very well may. Go well, ciao.

    Regards,
    Guro Dave Gould.
     
  18. long range

    long range New Member

    Dear Guro Dave,

    I'm extremly grateful that you have offered me the opportunity to continue my undertsnading of Lamceo Eskrima by asking you questions.
    please would it be possible to find out further information on Lameco's single/double Baraw,Espada Dagger,Dos Manos,along with the curriculum of Pangamut/Mano Mano.I ask this as these areas are my main interest of training in F.M.A

    Regards,
    Long Range.
     
  19. Guro Dave Gould

    Guro Dave Gould LAMECO ESKRIMA SYSTEM

    Long Range,

    What in specific would you like to know? As our curriculum is rather extensive in both scope and depth, it would be all but impossible to present it here on a public forum in a manner where one could obtain a fully functional understanding of the complete system as a whole. Lameco Eskrima is a very hands on system requiring hundreds of hours responding against unpredictable non-compliant exchange for one to begin to remotely understand the combative equation as it exists at its axis of uncertainty, chaos and mayhem. Punong Guro Sulite taught us first to study, learn and understand the combative euation in and of iteslf and all that surrounds it while using the combative situation as our model for training, he would then present to the student elements of the system that conforms around that reality.

    Lameco Eskrima is not a system of redundant techniques and drills, rather it is a system of proaction, reaction and interrogation based on minimizing risk while maximizing gain. To advance in the system one must obtain combative fluency in finding rythm with the combative situation itself, in real time against a non-compliant opponent. Punong Guro Sulite used to say that an ounce of combative truth is worth more than a pound of speculation. Which means that the more actual experience which you gain in fighting, or sparring to a lesser degree, the less that you need to depend on someone elses advice and opinions regarding combat. The goal is to one day adopt the combative situation in its entirety as your teacher, as experience is our greatest resource in all things combative. Experience speaks loudly with a resounding voice while ones advice, however well intended it may be, is only a soft whisper and in the end is only advice, or mere speculation to the combative learned.

    In Lameco Eskrima we study, learn, assimilate, actualize and execute. The latter is where one masters ones craft in ones execution, as all of the combative knowledge and expertise in the world falls flat if one can not execute when it is required. Punong Guro Sulite used to compare the evolution of a warrior to that of the transformation of a Caterpillar into a Butterfly. As a Caterpillar takes lifes lessons and enters the Cocoon it slowly transforms itself developing wings and undergoing all of the physical changes it must undergo in order to fly from the Cocoon, thereby meeting the requirements of its mandate destiny. As the Butterfly leaves the Cocoon it flies off never to re-enter the cocoon and go through reverse osmosis to become a caterpillar once again. Once a Butterfly it remains as such.

    We as Warriors in training share a similar fate and destiny in that our training is our Cocoon and once we transform from Martial Artist to Warriors and shed the cocoon, the cocoon becomes irrelevent. Upon our transformation the "training Cocoon" which was necessary for our transformation is shed from us leaving us to advance forward as Warriors, never having to look back to the cocoon for anything. Most systems teach numerous dead series of drills and redundant technique and place the emphasis of combative effect solely on those techniques and drills in redundant repetition. At some point in time to become effective the safety of the drill has to be evacuated and allow the function, for which the drill was created in the first place, to come forward and forge its way through to combative truth and under go the process of natural selection. The function is most important and once the function has been assimilated and actualized the drill becomes less important.

    In Lameco Eskrima the ability "to do" is greater than the preservation of any drills or series of redundant techniques which come forward. As the desired function is packaged in the drill with the drill only being successful once the function is fully assimilated and actualized in refined combative movement. So the most important element of our system is combative movement which is found in our basic fundamentals and foundation. Once the fundamentals are instilled then techniques, concepts and principles are introduced for exploration. Then we under go our transformation by introducing them to random unpredictable exchange against non-compliant opponents.

    When I teach I place more emphasis on developing actual combative skill than the ability to execute a specific drill or technique with flawless form. These things may be useful for the process of learning but my job as a teacher is to provide a result, that being excellence in combative movement. Once I develop a certain function from one of my students I encourage and nourish that function by introducing abject adversity in the hopes of bringing forth strong purpose in the execution of my student. The point of training in Lameco Eskrima is not to master drills but to be able to execute with combative efficiency if and when life and limb are placed in great peril. The one thing that stood out most about Punong Guro Sulite was not "what" he did but rather "how" he did it. He was intense, precise and deadly and anyone who stood in front of him, be it fighting, sparring or in training, understood that very quickly.

    Martial Arts, like everything else, is a perishable skill, therefore we must practice with intention every day or the skill will diminish and eventually disappear. Reaching the level of “Black Belt” or “Instructor” is not the end of ones martial journey, rather it is only the beginning. Only after a sound foundation has been forged and layed can we begin to build a dwelling on it which once built will stand in defiance of any unexpected tremble of the ground beneath it and overcome the tests of time. Just as the process of “Quenching” a sword is the moment that its character is revealed, the same could be said of combat revealing the character of the Warrior.

    Train well, ciao.

    Regards,
    Guro Dave Gould.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2010
  20. gagimilo

    gagimilo Member

    Brilliant post sir!
    It is really nice to remind onself (or be reminded by someone else) of some crucial things in trying to govern one's training.
     

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